An investigation into the reliability of Chinese medicine diagnosis according to eight guiding principles and Zang-Fu theory in Australians with hypercholesterolemia: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine

K.A. O'Brien, E. Abbas, J. Zhang, Z.-X. Guo, R. Luo, A. Bensoussan, P.A. Komesaroff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Chinese medicine distinguishes itself from Western medicine in the differentiation of diseases according to underlying patterns of disharmony, or Chinese medicine (CM) syndromes. CM has its own clinical endpoints that are used as evidence of change in the body. Yet, relatively little is known about the reliability of CM diagnostic techniques, the final diagnosis of a CM syndrome, or the organizing principles used to reach a CM diagnosis such as the Eight Guiding Principles. Information about reliability of CM diagnosis has important implications for clinical practice and research, particularly if CM diagnostic variables or CM syndromes are to be incorporated into study designs. Design: An inter-rater reliability study was conducted with three CM practitioners to investigate the reproducibility of CM diagnosis according to the Eight Guiding Principles and Zang-Fu Theory. Forty-five (45) adults with mild hypercholesterolemia but who were otherwise healthy participated in the study. Results: Our results suggest that there is a reasonably good level of agreement between at least two practitioners on the dimensions of the Eight Guiding Principles. Level of agreement between at least two practitioners on CM syndrome diagnosis according to Zang-Fu Theory was very good for one syndrome only, that of Spleen qi deficiency. Conclusions: Further investigations are needed into the reliability of the CM diagnostic processes from the initial stage of data collection to the final CM syndrome diagnosis. © 2009 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)259-266
Number of pages8
JournalJ. Altern. Complement. Med.
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Keywords

  • adult
  • aged
  • article
  • Australia
  • Chinese medicine
  • clinical article
  • controlled study
  • eight guiding principle
  • heart disease
  • human
  • hyperactivity
  • hypercholesterolemia
  • information processing
  • interrater reliability
  • kidney disease
  • liver disease
  • physician
  • population
  • priority journal
  • reproducibility
  • spleen defect
  • theory
  • zang fu theory
  • Adult
  • Attitude of Health Personnel
  • Clinical Competence
  • Diagnosis, Differential
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Hypercholesterolemia
  • Male
  • Medicine, Chinese Traditional
  • Middle Aged
  • Physical Examination
  • Reproducibility of Results
  • Research Design
  • Victoria
  • Yang Deficiency
  • Yin Deficiency

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