Correlates of meal skipping in community dwelling older adults: a cross-sectional study

Holly Wild, Danijela Gasevic , Robyn L Woods, Joanne Ryan, Michael Berk , Rory Wolfe, John McNeil, Alice J. Owen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To determine the correlates of meal skipping in community dwelling adults aged 70 years and over.
Design: Cross-sectional study.
Settings and Participants: 10,071 adults aged ≥70 years, participants in the ASPirin in Reducing Events in the Elderly (ASPREE) Longitudinal Study of Older Persons (ALSOP).
Measurements: The association between socio-demographic, social, psychological, behavioural and biomedical correlates and meal skipping (self-reported) was examined using multivariable binary logistic regression.

Results: The prevalence of meal skipping in this study was 19.5%. The results of the adjusted multivariable logistic regression analysis indicate that the odds (OR [95%CI]) of meal skipping were lower in adults aged 85+ years (vs. 70-74.9 years, 0.56 [0.45-0.70]), in women (vs. men 0.84 [0.75-0.94]), in those who lived outside urban areas (vs. urban area, 0.81 [0.72-0.92]), and in those with a higher than average mental component score (MCS) (vs. those with below average MCS, 0.76 [0.69-85]). Higher odds of meal skipping were observed for those living alone (vs. living with someone, 1.84 [1.64-2.05]), with more than 12 (vs. ≤12 years of formal education, 1.15 [1.04-1.28]), current smokers (vs. non-smokers, 2.07 [1.54-2.80]), consuming > 4 alcoholic drinks per day (vs. abstainers 1.93 [1.35-2.75]), and those who had self-reported poor oral health (vs. excellent oral health, 1.71 [1.07 -2.73]). Higher odds of meal skipping were also observed among those with diabetes (vs. without diabetes 1.26 [1.06-1.50]), or frailty (vs. those without, 1.63 [1.09-2.43]).
Conclusion: Numerous socio-demographic, social, psychological, behavioural and biomedical correlates of meal skipping behaviour in later life have been identified in this study, which may assist in targeting interventions to address meal skipping behaviour in older adults.
Key Words: meal skipping, older adults, nutrition, positive ageing
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Nutrition, Health and Aging
Publication statusSubmitted - 8 Jul 2022

Keywords

  • meal skipping, older adults, nutrition, positive ageing

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