Effect of socioeconomic deprivation on the population risk of incident heart failure hospitalisation: An analysis of the Renfrew/Paisley Study

S. Stewart, N. F. Murphy, J. J.V. McMurray, P. Jhund, C. L. Hart, D. Hole

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: There are few data describing the effect of socioeconomic deprivation on the risk of developing heart failure (HF). Aims: To examine the relationship between socioeconomic deprivation and hospitalisation with HF over 20 years. Methods: Between 1972 and 1976, 15,402 individuals, aged 45-64 years, residing in two towns in Scotland, underwent cardiovascular screening. We report hospitalisations with HF over the subsequent 20 years according to Carstairs deprivation category and Social Class. Results: Following screening, 628 men and women (4.1%) were hospitalised with a primary diagnosis of HF. There was a gradient in the risk of HF hospitalisation with increasing socioeconomic deprivation (P = 0.003). Of the most deprived individuals, 6.4% were hospitalised for HF compared to 3.5% of the most affluent group. Cox-proportional Hazard models showed that independent of age, sex and baseline risk factors for cardio-respiratory status, greater socioeconomic deprivation increased the risk of HF admission (P < 0.001, overall). The adjusted risk of admission for HF was 39% greater in the most versus least deprived subjects (RR 1.39 95% CI 1.04-2.01; P = 0.04). Conclusion: These data show a link between social deprivation and the risk of developing HF, irrespective of baseline cardio-respiratory status and cardiovascular risk factors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)856-863
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Journal of Heart Failure
Volume8
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • Heart failure
  • Morbidity

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