Examining self-care, self-compassion and compassion for others: A cross-sectional survey of palliative care nurses and doctors

Jason Mills, Timothy Wand, Jennifer A. Fraser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined levels of, and relationships between, self-care ability, self-compassion, and compassion among palliative care nurses and doctors. Methods: A total of 369 participants across Australia completed a cross-sectional survey comprising a demographic questionnaire and outcome measures for each variable. Descriptive and inferential statistics were analysed, controlling for potential social-desirability bias. Results: Levels of compassion, self-compassion and self-care ability varied, with some individuals scoring high or low in each. Self-compassion and self-care ability were positively correlated (r = .412, p <·001), whereas a negative correlation was observed between compassion and self-compassion (r = -.122, p <· 05). Linear regression further indicated that: increased compassion was associated with a decrease in self-compassion, and increased self-care ability was associated with an increase in self-compassion. Conclusion: These results suggest important implications for self-care in the palliative care workforce. Moreover, this study contributes an empirical basis to inform future research and education to promote balanced compassion and compassion literacy in palliative care practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4-11
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Palliative Nursing
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Jan 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Compassion
  • Compassion literacy
  • Palliative care
  • Self care
  • Self-compassion
  • Survey

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