Impact of academic majors on entrepreneurial intentions of Vietnamese students: An extension of the theory of planned behavior

Trung Kien Dao, Anh Tuan Bui, Thi Thu Trang Doan, Ngoc Tien Dao, Hieu Hoc Le, Thi Thu Ha Le

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This article investigates the effect of academic majors on entrepreneurial intentions of engineering and business students. The research model was established based on the extension of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) through combining the TPB model, perceived risks, academic majors and personalities of students. A sample of 1844 students from the four largest universities in engineering and business in Vietnam were surveyed. The main findings indicated that (i) the relationship in the TPB model was accepted except the effect of subjective norms on entrepreneurial intentions; (ii) perceived risks have negative impacts on perceived behavioral control; (iii) male engineering students have a higher entrepreneurial intentions than female students, but this result was not found in business students; (iv) engineering students have a higher entrepreneurial intentions than business students; (vi) there are no differences between the entrepreneurial intention of students coming from rural and urban areas. The study also contributes to some policy discussion to extend the current debate about the role of academic majors that students take in university in the entrepreneurial process as well as the importance of entrepreneurial students to society. Academic majors, business students, engineering students, entrepreneurial intentions, theory of planned behavior.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere06381
JournalHeliyon
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Academic majors
  • Business students
  • Engineering students
  • Entrepreneurial intentions
  • Theory of planned behavior

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Impact of academic majors on entrepreneurial intentions of Vietnamese students: An extension of the theory of planned behavior'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this