Improving access to health information for older migrants by using grounded theory and social network analysis to understand their information behaviour and digital technology use

K. T. Goodall, L. A. Newman, P. R. Ward

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Migrant well-being can be strongly influenced by the migration experience and subsequent degree of mainstream language acquisition. There is little research on how older Culturally And Linguistically Diverse (CALD) migrants who have 'aged in place' find health information, and the role which digital technology plays in this. Although the research for this paper was not focused on cancer, we draw out implications for providing cancer-related information to this group. We interviewed 54 participants (14 men and 40 women) aged 63-94 years, who were born in Italy or Greece, and who migrated to Australia mostly as young adults after World War II. Constructivist grounded theory and social network analysis were used for data analysis. Participants identified doctors, adult children, local television, spouse, local newspaper and radio as the most important information sources. They did not generally use computers, the Internet or mobile phones to access information. Literacy in their birth language, and the degree of proficiency in understanding and using English, influenced the range of information sources accessed and the means used. The ways in which older CALD migrants seek and access information has important implications for how professionals and policymakers deliver relevant information to them about cancer prevention, screening, support and treatment, particularly as information and resources are moved online as part of e-health.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)728-738
Number of pages11
JournalEuropean Journal of Cancer Care
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • CALD
  • E-health
  • Grounded theory
  • Migrants
  • Older people
  • Social network analysis

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