The Case of Australia Trust During Pandemic Uncertainty—A Qualitative Study of Midlife Women in South Australia

Paul R. Ward, Belinda Lunnay, Kristen Foley, Samantha B. Meyer, Jessica Thomas, Ian Olver, Emma R. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Government responses to COVID-19 have dramatically altered the social quality of daily circumstances. Consequently, theoretical questions about social cohesion require recalibra-tion as we explore new models of social quality. Central to this article is trust, one of the fundamental tenets of social cohesion. We present data from interviews with 40 women in midlife (45–64 years) regarding their everyday experiences of “life in lockdown” during the pandemic. Key themes focus on women’s (dis)trust in individuals (e.g., politicians, public health experts, family, themselves) and systems (e.g., politics, medicine, the media). This study provides insights into the differential impact of the pandemic in shaping public trust and hence social cohesion—in authority, institutions, and “each other”—with important lessons for how future efforts can rebuild trust in post-pandemic times.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)289-308
Number of pages20
JournalInternational Journal of Social Quality(United States)
Volume11
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Australia
  • COVID-19
  • Midlife women
  • Pandemic
  • Social cohesion
  • Social quality
  • Trust

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