Tissue resident macrophages are sufficient for demyelination during peripheral nerve myelin induced experimental autoimmune neuritis?

Jude Matthew Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The contribution of resident endoneurial tissue macrophages versus recruited monocyte derived macrophages to demyelination and disease during Experimental Autoimmune Neuritis (EAN) was investigated using passive transfer of peripheral nerve myelin (PNM) specific serum antibodies or adoptive co-transfer of PNM specific T and B cells from EAN donors to leukopenic and normal hosts. Passive transfer of PNM specific serum antibodies or adoptive co-transfer of myelin specific T and B cells into leukopenic recipients resulted in a moderate reduction in nerve conduction block or in the disease severity compared to the normal recipients. This was despite at least a 95% decrease in the number of circulating mononuclear cells during the development of nerve conduction block and disease and a 50% reduction in the number of infiltrating endoneurial macrophages in the nerve lesions of the leukopenic recipients. These observations suggest that during EAN in Lewis rats actively induced by immunization with peripheral nerve myelin, phagocytic macrophages originating from the resident endoneurial population may be sufficient to engage in demyelination initiated by anti-myelin antibodies in this model.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)69-76
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Neuroimmunology
Volume313
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Dec 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Antibodies
  • Demyelination
  • EAN
  • Monocyte
  • Peripheral nerve
  • Tissue macrophage

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Tissue resident macrophages are sufficient for demyelination during peripheral nerve myelin induced experimental autoimmune neuritis?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this